Brace yourselves local art fanatics for Lacey & Lace, a photography exhibition by Nadette Clare-Talbot. Hailing from South Africa, this local artist, will be featuring her recent work at Le Meridien Hotel and Spa in St. Julians, Malta. Ambitious curator, Claude Camilleri, the driving force behind Gallery Marcoux, as well as Le Meridien, will be overseeing the opening of Lacey & Lace. This event will take place Friday, May 27th, from 20:30 – 23:30 accompanied by a live jazz set by Quintessential (see link here).

I had the pleasure of interviewing the lovely Nadette this week and here’s what this great mind had to say. So sit down, put on your inspiration cap, and enjoy!

What does “being creative” mean to you?

The opportunity to work according to my own personal aesthetic

Tell me a bit about this project. What gave you the idea? Is it going the way you had originally planned or has it altered along the way?

Lacey & Lace is my passion project and I do feel very connected to this exhibition as its my first and really a dream come true for me in the sense that I worked long and hard creating images that represent my photography in the way I would like it to be seen. The idea was born to do a collection that would merge my love of lace with beauty and stills photography. For the most part it really has transpired the way I had hoped.

Tell me about your first series as a photographer? What inspired that series?

This is my first personal series as a photographer! My background is in commercial photography – so Lacey & Lace was inspired by yearning to be creative on my own terms.

What are you trying to communicate with your art?

Simply put – beautiful imagery that connects with people on some level, but I’m certainly not trying to persuade anyone to a specific message.

Can you describe the time when you first picked up a camera and started experimenting with photography?

I have always wanted to be a photographer –  so it all started as a teenager when I was the only student in my final high school year to Art major in Photography. My dad helped me to set up a little darkroom at our home and I would spend endless hours photographing, developing and printing pictures in black and white. Thinking back, it was such a magical and carefree time when you really don’t have the technical know-how, but somehow manage to create interesting photographs.

Who bought you your first camera?

My parents.

Do you remember the first photo you were really proud of?

It was part of my high school photography portfolio – a little 3 picture series dabbling in multiple exposure.

What is your biggest achievement in your own eyes?

Creatively speaking, Lacey & Lace.

What is your biggest achievement in the public eye?

As a commercial photographer I had the privilege to photograph Oprah when she opened up her school for girls in South Africa.

Where do you find much of your inspiration?

Everywhere really, but I’m finding that more and more I am being inspired by all the different visual arts; make-up, fashion, film, architecture and decor. Everything has the potential to merge and crossover…

What does photography give you that nobody or nothing else in this world can give you?

Personal creative satisfaction.

Are there any other art forms that give you this?

Music, I love music!

If you could give your photography style a name, what would it be?

Tricky question – I am so inspired and in awe of the photographers that have a very carefree and “loose” shooting style, but I would reluctantly have to admit I am the complete opposite.  Quite controlled – but it pains me to admit that.

What’s the most indispensable item in your studio?

My cameras.

What’s your art-world pet peeve?

That everybody is a “photographer” these days….

Do you have a gallery/museum-going routine?

 Not per se, but I do love to visit different galleries when I travel.

Today, with as much information as we have available through books and the Internet, do you think it’s more beneficial to be self-taught or to take classes in the arts? How did you get started?

In photography terms, there are as many successful photographers that have a formal education in photography as there are photographers that are self-taught, and realistically photographers are known for the imagery they create and not their education; but I strongly believe either way, all aspiring photographers should start out the same way – humble with a willingness to work hard. I have a degree in Photography and was trained in shooting film and Polaroid with medium and large format cameras, so I feel truly blessed that is my background before it all went digital.

What’s the best advice you ever had about how to be more creative?

Enjoy the process!

Are there any artists out there that you admire? Who and why?

Photographer Tim Walker is my all time favorite artist and I am astounded by his imagery. I would love to know how his mind works. Photographer Paolo Roversi is another favorite whose photographic style is truly captivating. Locally I think artist Goxwa is just amazing, her portraits really resonate with me.

What is your favorite place to see art?

London. I love to visit The National Portrait Gallery and Somerset House.

What work of art do you wish you owned?

Vladimir Tretchikoff’s Miss Wong (the original).

What under-appreciated artist, gallery, or work do you think people should know about?

Contemporary Photography! I think we still have a long way to go in photography appreciation as an art form.


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